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Oct 31, 2002
"It may not be sexy, but Peter Chernin, president and chief operating officer of News Corp., said Hollywood’s biggest problem is the lack of copyright protection for digitized television shows and movies, allowing for rampant theft over computer networks of studios’ valuable intellectual property."
Oct 31, 2002
"A security researcher asked a federal judge Wednesday to let a challenge to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act continue."
Oct 31, 2002
"The music industry risks alienating its core consumers by selling copy-protected CDs without warning labels, according to research."
Oct 31, 2002
The Hollywood Reporter writes that extending the DGA's reasoning on the CleanFlicks case "could lead to disturbing scenarios. Readers could be prohibited from skipping a chapter in a book. Music fans would have to listen to every song on a CD, in order, every time they put the disc in a player."
Oct 30, 2002
"EMI Recorded Music on Tuesday agreed to use audio fingerprinting technology from Audible Magic to identify and track licensed and unlicensed online usage of its song catalog."
Oct 29, 2002
Microsoft opposes the sale of Bluelight.com because the sale would violate Microsoft's copyrights: "The licenses that debtors (Kmart) have of Microsoft's products are licenses of copyrighted materials and, therefore, may not be assumed or assigned with Microsoft's consent."
Oct 29, 2002
Some stats on PVRs: "20% of the commercials are NEVER watched by PVR owners. But, 80% claim they watch certain commercials deliberately for entertainment and product interest."
Oct 29, 2002
Microsoft's new Media Center PC will "play but not copy a show broadcast with a copy-prohibiting code called Copy Generation Management System for Analog. Most shows now broadcast do not have the CGMSA tag, but you have to wonder how long that will last if enough Media Center PCs are sold."
Oct 29, 2002
"The entire schedule of the new network, Fine Living, has been specifically set up to incorporate various forms of advertising that can foil the abilities of personal video recorders like TiVo and ReplayTV. Every show, for example, is available for sponsorship, while advertisers are collaborating in the making of certain one-minute segments that run in the middle of programs."
Oct 29, 2002
"When a law such as the DMCA cripples free speech to the point where a company such as Red Hat is too scared to release details of a patch it is distributing, something is dreadfully wrong. This law crosses the line from protecting business to enforcing ignorance."
Oct 29, 2002
"Six months ago, company executives said Time Warner Cable's chief executive, Glenn A. Britt, discussed the feasibility of a 30-second fast-forward button as part of its video-recorder services. But executives from Warner television studios and Turner Broadcasting argued against it, some calling it "the 30-second ad-skip button." Mr. Britt decided to drop it, people in the meetings said."
Oct 29, 2002
321 Studio's software "enable[s] the copying of discs even if they are scrambled to prevent duplication, as are most movies sold on DVD. This sort of product, officials at the Motion Picture Assn. of America say, blatantly violates a 1998 federal law against picking the electronic locks on copyrighted works. Moore disagrees, saying the public has the right to make backup copies of the DVDs it buys."
Oct 28, 2002
"According to a survey recently released by GartnerG2, the research service of Gartner/Dataquest, 77 percent of respondents thought they should be able to copy CDs for personal use in another device. Also, 60 percent said they should be able to give copies of CDs to members of their families."
Oct 28, 2002
"Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Rep. Chris Cox, R-Calif., on Friday introduced a bipartisan, bicameral joint resolution that seeks to assure that the fair use rights of individuals are not eroded in the digital world."
Oct 28, 2002
"Utilizing Epic parent Sony's proprietary ConnecteD technology as a key, the disc -- due Tuesday (Oct. 29) -- will unlock an area on Amos' official Web site that will host everything from music to photos, contests, and commentary by the artist."
Oct 28, 2002
"While some legislators have noticed flaws in the expansionists' goals, the abolitionists are silently gaining ground. The public should stay tuned because the very legitimacy of intellectual property may be at stake."
Oct 28, 2002
"Advance publicity is key to a record albums' success, according to Wharton marketing professor Peter Fader, and by trying to stamp out peer-to-peer music trading, record companies are shooting themselves in the foot."
Oct 28, 2002
"So if Smith is being principled, then properly stated, Smith's principle comes down to this: That the government should not fund any research that results in code that some companies could not, consistent with their business model, adopt."
Oct 28, 2002
Bruce Mehlman from the US Dept. of Commerce said that it is "critical for content creators to accept the reality that we will never be able to entirely eliminate online piracy, just as we have never been able to eliminate offline piracy. The Internet was built to connect, not to contain, and the battle against piracy will be won or lost based upon the quality of legitimate online consumer offerings. Paid services can beat elusive and illegal peer-to-peer networks by offering greater features and selection at reasonable prices and in the formats consumers want (e.g., usable throughout a home network). They lose when they refuse to compete."
Oct 26, 2002
CinemaNow distributes films online: "Universal Studios has since agreed to test CinemaNow with Big Fat Liar, The Scorpion King, Psycho and Erin Brockovich (again, just for US consumption) but only for four months. Meanwhile the contract with Warner Bros will close about the same time."
Oct 25, 2002
"Law professors and academic-library groups are asking a federal appeals court here to modify a recent ruling to make it clear that established copyright provisions, like fair use, sometimes trump software-licensing agreements that would otherwise narrow consumers' rights."
Oct 25, 2002
"An attack on the software license behind the Linux operating system has stirred up a free software controversy in Washington."
Oct 25, 2002
"The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and songwriters' associations have drafted a letter expected to be sent Friday to the Fortune 1000 companies, cautioning executives that employees' song- or movie-swapping could put them at legal risk."
Oct 25, 2002
Nintendo is to be fined for anti-trust because of its use of region-coding for its games. "Console outfit Nintendo broke European antitrust laws, and an announcement of the level of fine is possible by next week, according to today's Wall Street Journal. Nintendo's sin, says the Journal, was obstructing cross-border sales, thus allowing it to keep prices high, and keep a frim grip on its distribution channel."
Oct 24, 2002
"As it readies a new version of its online music subscription service, Listen.com plans to announce on Thursday agreements to allow consumers to burn CDs from digital files. It won't be the digital free-for-all seen in the popular file-swapping arenas, however. The company will charge consumers 99 cents per song, which means a full album of songs will cost only a few dollars less than the retail price."
Oct 24, 2002
"Web publishers have long been targets of zealous copyright and trademark holders, but free speech advocates say intellectual property owners these days are more aggressively training their legal guns on both small one-man-band Web sites and the Internet service providers (ISPs) that host or link to them, hoping to get pages or material removed."
Oct 24, 2002
"A proposal to let copyright owners hack into and disrupt peer-to-peer networks will be revised, a congressional aide said Wednesday. Alec French, an aide to bill author Rep. Howard Berman, D-Calif., defended his boss' ideas but acknowledged that some critics had made reasonable points about the controversial proposal."
Oct 24, 2002
"The adventures of KaZaA, the post-Napster file-sharing company, sound like the stuff of a James Bond film. Facing lawsuits in two continents, KaZaA's experience heralds the new era of transnational litigation in a globalized world."
Oct 24, 2002
"Congress has a long history, in the copyright arena, of ignoring the public interest, and asking only what the industries desire. That, of course, is why Mickey and Sonny got their extra 20 years. This is the dark heart of copyright law. But recently the members have taken note of the increasing roar of Internet-savvy young people, including their own teen-age and young adult children."
Oct 24, 2002
"Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., was criticized Wednesday by the chairman of a House technology committee for an attack on the free software movement. [...] Microsoft is Smith's top source of donations."
Oct 24, 2002
"George Ziemann didn't have delusions of grandeur when it came to selling his band's CD. He just wanted to promote the album -- and hopefully sell a few copies -- on a higher-traffic site than his own. So he turned to eBay, the Net's largest marketplace. But the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), a law meant to limit people from distributing content illegally over the Internet, foiled him."
Oct 23, 2002
A list of books that are in the public domain in other parts of the world but still copyrighted in the US.
Oct 23, 2002
"The framers would never have allowed millions of monopolies for the benefit of just 2 percent; they would not have sacrificed the public domain to benefit a favored few. [...] As the Supreme Court once said about a statute that banned all indecent speech so that children would not be exposed, we don't "burn the house to roast the pig." Exactly right--not even to save a mouse."
Oct 23, 2002
"If ideas are going to continue to receive appropriate protection, the global bargain of intellectual property needs to be reinvigorated."
Oct 23, 2002
Janis Ian: "The RIAA's claim that the industry and artists are hurt by free downloading is nonsense. Consider my experience: I'm a recording artist who has sold multiple platinum records since the 1960s. [...] On the first day I posted downloadable music, my merchandise sales tripled, and they have stayed that way ever since."
Oct 22, 2002
"Almost one-third of the members of Congress support the technology sector's agenda, according to the Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) in its high-tech voting guide released Monday."
Oct 22, 2002
"The recording industry should learn to live with and profit from file sharing, instead of fighting it, representatives of songwriters and technology companies said Monday at a conference on copyright law."
Oct 22, 2002
"When Senator Ernest F. Hollings set out to fight digital piracy, chances were he was not seeking to regulate the inner workings of digital hearing aids, robotic dogs or Shop With Me Barbie cash registers. But a bill that Mr. Hollings, Democrat of South Carolina, introduced last spring would do just that, according to Edward W. Felten, an associate professor of computer science at Princeton."
Oct 22, 2002
"In fact, the constitutional arguments against the CTEA are the same ones Rehnquist has made the centerpiece of his judicial legacy: that the Constitution grants Congress limited powers, which may only be exercised for carefully enumerated purposes. Seen in this light, the case for striking down the CTEA is actually stronger than the case for striking down the Violence Against Women Act, the Brady Bill, the Gun-Free School Zones Act, and other federal laws that Rehnquist and his conservative colleagues have held exceed Congress's enumerated powers. If the Court upholds the CTEA while continuing to strike down far less objectionable statutes in the name of limited federal government, Rehnquist's crusade to limit Congress's power will be clearly revealed to be based not on devotion to constitutional text and history but on the political and economic interests that a given law serves."
Oct 21, 2002
"Watch your step: If you've ever exercised your cat by having it chase the reflected spot of a laser pointer, you and kitty may be in violation of a bona fide U.S. patent."
Oct 21, 2002
"A senior Republican senator has held up passage of a bill that would have lowered the royalty fees that small Webcasters pay to stream music over the Internet."
Oct 21, 2002
"What galls Westley and others is that record companies want money from Webcasters that they do not get to collect from radio."
Oct 21, 2002
"A federal court today affirmed the right of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to represent ReplayTV owners in their lawsuit against 28 motion picture and television industry companies."
Oct 21, 2002
"Many of the justices seemed to feel that Congress had indeed made a bad decision and unnecessarily rewarded corporations at the expense of the public -- but didn't seem to think that they had the constitutional leeway to do anything about it."
Oct 21, 2002
Marybeth Peters, an important official in the Copyright Office, holds a great deal of control over the way copyright law is interpreted. She "believes that many "fair-use" practices consumers take for granted, such as taping a TV program or copying a magazine article, need to be reevaluated in the digital age because the economic harm to copyright owners is far greater."
Oct 20, 2002
"Despite their cries of piracy, file trading is not what the record industry fears. What they fear is competition, something the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA) figured out with regard to the Internet long before they ever took Napster to trial."
Oct 18, 2002
A talk with the head of the White House Office of Cyber Security. "At the town meeting, Clarke responded to a question about the controversial Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The act makes it illegal to publicize the existence of security flaws in computer software, but computer software companies have used the law to threaten legal action against academic researchers who publicize their discoveries of such flaws. Clarke said such threats were a misuse of the law and that reform is needed. 'I think a lot of people didn't realize that it would have this potential chilling effect on vulnerability research.'"
Oct 18, 2002
"Intertainer, a Los Angeles company that distributes movies over the Internet and cable television networks, said yesterday that it would close its service, citing licensing practices by the major movie studios that it said were unfair." Their lawsuit says that "the studios conspired to withhold their movies from Intertainer to benefit Movielink, a rival venture of their own that is scheduled to start soon."
Oct 18, 2002
"Somebody has finally started thinking about including consumers in the discussion about digital media."
Oct 18, 2002
"With their defensive posture on digital piracy, media companies are damaging their long-term interests."
Oct 18, 2002
An engineer has filed patents related to Palladium. "The patents [describe] methods for using the Palladium infrastructure to assist in the enforcement of software licensing. [...] The twist is that Green has no intention of implementing these techniques himself -- and in an interview with Wired News, declared his intention to "aggressively enforce his patents," if granted, to prevent anyone else from doing so."
Oct 18, 2002
Interesting analysis of copyrights and creative freedom.
Oct 18, 2002
At the Agenda conference: "The most heated debate of the event came during a panel of Hollywood executives who criticized the technology industries for their lax adherence to intellectual property protection and copyright issues in the digital era. That evoked a response from many executives here that the entertainment industry's unwillingness to explore new business models was primarily responsible for the industry's lack of growth."
Oct 18, 2002
"Last night I had a strange dream. The DRMocrats have just been re-elected, sweeping all three houses of government in a virtual landslide. When MBC/Disney declares the victory at 7 a.m. EST -- 10 seconds after the polls open -- Supreme Court Chief Justice Jack Valenti certifies the results and activates four more years of rights to the Raikes-Allchin ticket."
Oct 18, 2002
"In engineering, copying gives us standards, predictable behavior, interchangeable parts, and the Industrial Revolution. In science, it's not a discovery until someone has copied your procedure down to the last detail and attained the same results. Copying is essential to innovation. Intellectual property laws arose to place very limited constraints on copying to achieve certain limited societal benefits. The idea was to make sure that there were financial rewards to innovation. The idea was not to stifle innovation."
Oct 18, 2002
"To make the case that the 1998 law should be overturned, Lessig's camp scared up the support of 17 prominent economists. [...] Add it all up, the economists calculated, and the extra 20 years add only 0.3% to the value of a new copyright."
Oct 18, 2002
Lessig on his Supreme Court testimony: "[T]he striking feature of the argument was that in spite of 600 pages of filings in support of the Sony Bono law, it was clear that the justices did not believe the extension had anything to do with the constitutional aim of promoting progress. Rather, they expressed an impatient contempt for what Congress had done. The question they were struggling with (rightly) was whether they had the power to do anything about it."
Oct 17, 2002
"Frankly, I would be very interested in having the RIAA go on record and explain exactly what fair use "rights" permit in their view of things [...]. We know some things about the RIAA's beliefs. For example, the RIAA does not believe that "fair use" includes personal use copying (such as ripping MP3s and making a mix CD for your car)."
Oct 17, 2002
The RIAA's rebuttal to Gary Shapiro's editorial on downloading. "The last thing we need is more overheated and polarizing rhetoric. Shapiro would do well to drop the destructive diatribes and instead engage in some constructive dialogue. That's the only way we're going to figure out how to better serve consumers, creators and technology companies alike in these challenging times."
Oct 17, 2002
Rick McCallum worries about the impact of file sharing. "The business will implode once you can download a movie, give it to your friends and not have a moral problem with doing it. Then we're screwed. Literally, our very lives are at stake now. George and I are just praying that we can finish 'Episode III' in time, before it's all over."
Oct 16, 2002
"It's easy to fail in e-business; what's hard is failing magnificently. The Big Five music-recording companies have been transcendent in this respect. Their combined efforts have gone beyond killing their e-businesses and are close to destroying an entire industry."
Oct 16, 2002
"The fate of the high-tech economy has always hinged on the successful introduction of a steady stream of new technologies and services. One of the reasons so many techies are out of work right now is because companies don't hire people to make products that might be illegal, such as anything capable of copying digital media."
Oct 16, 2002
"The basic issue is that many consumers expect that when they buy a CD or DVD that they should have the right to make a backup copy of it and also place a copy on personally owned portable players and PCs. The industry representatives claimed they want to offer many choices but that the more choice you want the more you should have to pay. I think most of the audience believes that the industry is out of touch."
Oct 16, 2002
At the Agenda 2003 conference, "three members of the Hollywood establishment proved their absolute cluelessness about technology while confirming the prevailing Washington "wisdom" -- the notion that we can somehow stop one kind of copying without preventing all kinds of legitimate uses of computers."
Oct 16, 2002
"Starting Nov. 19, the United States Copyright Office will begin taking public comments on the section of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, known as the DMCA, which prohibits people from breaking encryption technologies."
Oct 16, 2002
"The Minister of Economic Affairs Lin Yi-fu confirmed yesterday that Taiwan authorities had rejected the United States' demand to extend Taiwan's protection of copyrights from the current 50 years to 70 years in a discussion between the U.S. and Taiwan on intellectual property rights."
Oct 16, 2002
"Red Hat has struck a small blow against the DMCA, by publishing a security patch which can only be explained fully to people who are not within US jurisdiction."
Oct 16, 2002
"And the hard thing about this case is that at any given moment -- including the present time -- copyright law specifies a limit. While that limited duration is currently far too long, it formally complies with the Constitution's requirements. The question the court confronts, therefore, is whether to look behind this fiction and address what Congress is really doing or to defer and leave the matter in the political arena."
Oct 15, 2002
"A new report suggests that, post-Napster, consumers are still flocking to Internet sites that offer downloadable music -- even those that cost money."
Oct 15, 2002
The EFF's Fred von Lohmann says that "Congress would be 'putting the dinosaurs in charge of evolution' if Hollywood succeeds in obtaining a federal law that would restrict consumer use of digital video and music [...]."
Oct 15, 2002
"Do architects get moral rights too? Can they show up at your doorstep and demand that the painters you hired to change your home's color scheme cease and desist? How about photographers? Can Ansel Adam's heirs stop my local framing shop from putting my poster of Moon and Half-Dome in a gilt wood frame because this conflicts with Adam's original vision? The answers are, if the WGAw's position were law, yes and yes."
Oct 15, 2002
"I can't promise that we won't be sued--that sometimes happens when you innovate. There is nothing in any of the lawsuits that would shut us down, even the big ones. The ReplayTV lawsuit is designed to have us remove some of the features--not to go back to the dark ages before there were DVR's."
Oct 14, 2002
"[T]he act of modifying a game's code or a hardware console is polarizing for gaming enthusiasts, software makers, and hardware manufacturers. Some believe it fosters sales and customer devotion, while others view it as an infringement strictly forbidden by 1998's Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)."
Oct 14, 2002
"Some of the justices expressed what bordered on disdain for the 1998 legislation, which passed after intensive lobbying by the major film studios. [...] But there is a big difference between thinking a law is bad policy and finding it unconstitutional."
Oct 14, 2002
"The Internet Radio community is in turmoil. The Webcasters trade body looks likely to split over the issue of performance royalties, with many grassroots webcasters resigning in disgust at the HR.5469 bill now before the Senate."
Oct 14, 2002
"The United States Copyright Office is launching a rare round of public comment on rules that bar people from breaking through digital copy-protection technology on works such as music, movies, software or electronic books. Regulators aren't looking to change the law, but they are looking for public suggestions on what kinds of activity should be legalized in spite of the rules."
Oct 14, 2002
"Under the current copyright regime, short-term profit outweighs long-term value. As copyright protection lurches toward perpetuity, America's cultural heritage — in whatever media — is increasingly becoming the property of corporate copyright holders. But it belongs to all of us. Technology has given fans the means to enhance and protect this common heritage. The law should give them the right."
Oct 14, 2002
"Every advance in technology that has put a little more power into the hands of consumers engenders a negative reaction from an industry scared to death about not being able to control how, when, where, and what consumers watch or listen to."
Oct 14, 2002
"The problem is simple: Copyright law has diverged wildly from what the average Internet user and DVD owner believes it is reasonable to do. This can result in a dangerous and unstable situation, where the police have the legal authority to toss so many otherwise law-abiding people in prison. It creates contempt for the law and the courts. It's a throwback to Prohibition, when booze was illegal, but bootlegging was common."
Oct 14, 2002
Ed Felten writes: "I was at a conference in Washington, DC on Friday and Saturday. Participants included some people who are reasonably plugged in to the Washington political process. I was stunned to hear one of these folks sum up the Washington conventional wisdom like this: 'The political dialog today is that the general purpose computer is a threat, not only to copyright but to our entire future.'"
Oct 14, 2002
"The commission's report comes amid a growing backlash in developing countries against the imposition of a strong global system of intellectual property rights. The lightning-rod issue has been the AIDS epidemic, and the resulting confrontation between developing nations and the pharmaceutical industry."
Oct 14, 2002
Turner CEO is "not against PVRs", but has dire warnings about their threat to our American way of life: "I believe advertising has driven this country. Without advertising, we will damage this country."
Oct 13, 2002
"An added bonus for record companies and retailers, who are engaged in a battle against piracy, is that the relative complexity of DVD-Audios and SACDs makes them much harder to copy. At the same time, that might turn some consumers off the format."
Oct 13, 2002
Good overview of the strategy Lessig was pursuing and how successful he thinks it was.
Oct 13, 2002
"Let the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) and the MPA (Motion Picture Association) engage in a war of technology and wits with the youth of the world but, for God's sake, let's not commit the force of law and the resources of our government to another hopeless war against our own future."
Oct 13, 2002
"In a letter to more than 2,300 colleges and universities, members of the creative content industries this week reached out to the U.S. higher education community to make them aware of, and ask for their help in stopping, the theft of copyrighted works that is plaguing college campuses."
Oct 12, 2002
"Federal copyright regulators are opening the door for new exceptions to a controversial copyright law that has landed one publisher in court and a Russian programmer in jail."
Oct 12, 2002
"Taiwan has turned down a U.S. demand on Friday to extend copyrights on works including earlier Walt Disney movies for another 20 years as negotiators on both sides held talks on intellectual property rights."
Oct 11, 2002
"It's easy to say that DRM passports are reliable and non-intrusive and that articles such as this one are alarmist. Accepting liability is something else."
Oct 11, 2002
"The purpose of the 1998 Congressional extension was not protecting artists, but enriching media companies that hold property rights in their creations, virtually in perpetuity. The founders did not envision copyright being put to this use, and the Supreme Court should not allow it."
Oct 10, 2002
"Hackers have latched on to mod chips as a conduit for running homemade software on the Xbox, leading to development of programs such as an Xbox version of the Linux operating system."
Oct 10, 2002
"Herndon, Va.-based Cinea, the company Schumann co-founded after Divx folded in 1999, is close to unveiling a beta for its Cosmos digital cinema security system that will help movie distributors keep track of how their products are used while protecting them from piracy."
Oct 10, 2002
The author of VisiCalc writes: "If you are an artist or author who cares more than about the near-term value of your work, you should be worried and be careful about releasing your work only in copy protected form. Like the days when "art" was only accessible to the rich, two classes will probably develop: Copy protected and not copy protected, the "high art" and "folk art" of tomorrow."
Oct 10, 2002
"If current copyright laws had been on the books when jazz musicians were borrowing riffs from other artists in the 1930s and Looney Tunes illustrators were creating cartoons in the 1940s, entire art genres such as hip-hop, collage and Pop Art might never have existed."
Oct 10, 2002
"The number of users taking advantage of illegal file-sharing on the net is on the rise, according to new figures from analyst firm Jupiter Media."
Oct 10, 2002
"Several members of the U.S. Supreme Court signaled reluctance to overturn a law that extended millions of copyrights for 20 years, as the justices aimed a barrage of questions at a lawyer challenging the statute."
Oct 09, 2002
"Microsoft has bowed to consumer pressure and pulled back from a controversial plan that would have encrypted TV shows recorded on forthcoming digital media PCs."
Oct 09, 2002
"When a Disney or a Microsoft puts more resources into enforcing and extending copyright monopolies than it does into creating or innovating in the first place, it's clear that something is out of balance. It's time for somebody - if not the Supreme Court, then Congress itself - to reevaluate the whole arrangement."
Oct 09, 2002
"The Media Center software has been changed so that now the copyright owner, not Microsoft, gets to decide whether a particular TV program will be 'encrypted to the hard drive'--meaning, 'unable to be viewed on a different PC or DVD player.' This is done by making the Media Center software cognizant of a television standard called Copy Generation Management System for Analog (CGMS-A)."
Oct 09, 2002
"Angered by a law that extends copyright terms for 20 years, a crusader named Brewster Kahle wants to use the Internet to make books available to everyone."
Oct 09, 2002
"Rock stars Bob Dylan, Billy Joel and James Taylor filed a lawsuit against Vivendi Universal's MP3.com music Web site for allegedly distributing their songs without authorization, sources familiar with the suit said on Tuesday."
Oct 09, 2002
"Whether the New Music Jukebox site accomplishes its goals and grows exponentially the way its planners hope will depend on whether officials at the center can continue to wrestle with the legal complications and forge compromises with publishers and recording companies. Their counterparts in other fields will likely be paying attention."
Oct 09, 2002
"The most disturbing thing about the Solicitor General's argument was that no questions were asked regarding the First Amendment issues. Conclusion: Eldred loses the First Amendment issues completely."
Oct 09, 2002
"Hollywood's key argument is that without the extended protection it would no longer have a commercial incentive to preserve its historic film archives, and face unacceptable risks when re-releasing classics such as Gone With The Wind and Citizen Kane in new media formats such as DVD."
Oct 08, 2002
"A bill exempting small Webcasters from fees that had threatened to drive many small operations out of business passed the House of Representatives on Monday."
Oct 08, 2002
CinemaNow "offers pay-for-view movies available in Windows Media 9 Series formats that can be downloaded and watched in Microsoft's player, which includes secure digital video delivery."
Oct 08, 2002
"With last week's introduction of legislation protecting 'consumers' rights in the digital age,' the stage is set for a heated debate next year about what home users would be allowed to do with copyrighted music and video, and how far the entertainment industry could go to protect its content."
Oct 08, 2002
"President Bush is expected to sign a bill, passed last week, that would open the door for professors to use some copyrighted works in online courses without having to seek permission."
Oct 08, 2002
"In its long and illustrious history, Disney has been a leading beneficiary of the public domain, that great ocean of metaphors, melodies, images and ideas where original works go for anyone to use once their copyright protections expire. But now Disney and other entertainment giants want to change the rules and keep their own creations away from public use for as long as possible."
Oct 07, 2002
"Two heavyweights, Hollywood and Silicon Valley, take the fight over content to the Supremes."
Oct 07, 2002
"In recent years, we have witnessed an erosion of the historic and crucial balance in copyright law among users, creators, and owners. This timely legislation will protect the interests of the public by restoring that balance."
Oct 07, 2002
"In a landmark case, the Supreme Court will soon decide when Mickey and friends should become part of the public domain."
Oct 07, 2002
"Verizon Communications faced tough questions from a federal judge on Friday as the telecommunications giant sought to resist being drafted as the recording industry's copyright overseer."
Oct 07, 2002
"Anyone interested in the future direction of technology should pay attention to a case the U.S. Supreme Court will hear when the new session begins this week."
Oct 07, 2002
"Small Internet broadcasters and the music industry have agreed on a last-minute royalty-payment plan but a dispute between musicians and record labels threatens to scuttle the deal, sources said Sunday."
Oct 07, 2002
"Under the rules of the game when the play was written, the original bargain with the public, the play would have entered the public domain in 1992. [...] In 1998, the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act extended the term of the copyright until 2031."
Oct 07, 2002
"Most revealing quote of the day went to Brad Hunt, CTO of the MPAA, who at one point summed up the challenge facing the entertainment and computing industries this way: 'How do you make the PC a trusted entertainment appliance?'"
Oct 07, 2002
The head of the CEA "chided Hollywood for its 'focus on litigation' and for lobbying Congress to pass laws that prohibit Net-based innovations."
Oct 07, 2002
"[...] Hollywood is trying to shut down the EFF's political work in a pretty underhanded way. What if Thurgood Marshall had been kept off of Brown v. Board of Ed. because the NAACP was a 'competitor' of segregationists?"
Oct 07, 2002
"Two bills introduced this week in the House sought to redefine consumer rights in the digital era, a departure in a congressional session during which more attention has been paid to protecting copyrighted works from computer-aided piracy."
Oct 07, 2002
"Rep. Lofgren is to be commended for approaching home technological issues from the consumer's point of view. Too many involved in this discussion see issues only from the standpoint of the content owner. Such a narrow focus is in the long-term interest of neither the content community nor the American consumer."
Oct 07, 2002
"321 Studios is heading to court to find out why you can legally make copies of video tapes and CDs, but not DVDs."
Oct 06, 2002
"The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments this week over the constitutionality of a 1998 law that extended copyright protection by 20 years. Experts on both sides of the closely watched case say that its outcome could reshape the way cultural products are consumed and how their profits are divided."
Oct 06, 2002
"Having vanquished the music swapping service Napster in court, the entertainment industry is facing a formidable obstacle in pursuing its major successor, KaZaA: geography."
Oct 06, 2002
"In Malaysia the pirates now produce pirated VCDs on ships to avoid being caught. The production is done at high sea and the products are delivered at the coastline."
Oct 05, 2002
"A US judge has said that the law governing the trading of music files over the internet is unclear."
Oct 04, 2002
"Two US Congress representatives are this week raising the standard of rebellion against the entertainment business' use of DRM and the DMCA to erode consumer rights, and hence to enhance their own revenues."
Oct 04, 2002
"Could singing fish novelties be hooked by a proposed law requiring anti-copying technology in digital devices?"
Oct 04, 2002
Tim O'Reilly at the OS X conference: "over 100,000 books are published annually, but only a few thousand sell in any significant numbers. Most books, regardless of their quality, can't be read simply because they are not available. For books at risk of falling into oblivion, O'Reilly said that piracy could be the best thing that happened to them."
Oct 04, 2002
"In my view, the peer-to-peer authors have a natural advantage in this arms race, and they will be able to stay a step ahead of the copyright owners. [...] I conclude that the Berman Bill as written is unlikely to do copyright holders much good in the end."
Oct 04, 2002
"A proposal to defang a controversial copyright law became public on Thursday, after more than a year of anticipation and months of closed-door negotiations with potential supporters."
Oct 04, 2002
"With talk of preemptive war all the rage on Capitol Hill, it seems that such posturing has extended into the world of digital copyright law. On Thursday Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va.) and Rep. John Doolittle (D-Calif.) introduced the Digital Media Consumers Rights Act to preserve specific fair-use rights to copy digital works as well as 'circumvention' rights to bypass copy protections."
Oct 04, 2002
"The judge's decision, which could come at any time, could dictate how copyright holders deal with Internet piracy in the future. A music industry win would give copyright holders leeway to get hundreds of names of Internet file-swappers without going to court first."
Oct 04, 2002
"Verizon has already agreed to hand over the subscriber's name if the music firms' trade group, the Recording Industry Association of America, files a separate 'John Doe' suit against the subscriber. The RIAA refused. Top RIAA lawyer Cary Sherman said anti-piracy laws don't require a separate suit, which would require more time and expense."
Oct 04, 2002
"Headline-grabbing skirmishes such as the conflict between the recording industry and the inventors of the popular Napster music-trading system are important, but beyond them lies something larger: a clash of visions for the future. If one side prevails, we will have a tightly regulated global supermarket of electronic goodies such as computer games, recorded music, videos, software programs and printed text. If the other side wins, we will have a loosely regulated electronic commons in which such items will be much more freely shared, traded, improvised and generally played around with."
Oct 04, 2002
"In a stage setting event for what promises to a bitter and bruising legislative battle next year, Congressmen Rick Boucher (D.-Va.) and John Doolittle (R.-Calif.) introduced a bill Thursday afternoon that would add fair use protections to U.S. copyright law [...]."
Oct 04, 2002
"Napster founder Shawn Fanning is taking his story to the small screen. MTV said it's struck a deal with the peer-to-peer wunderkind for the rights to Fanning's life story."
Oct 03, 2002
Interesting article about automatic enforcement of laws, including copyright laws. "The brief also identifies a file entitled 'harry potter book report.rtf' whose name and tiny size (1K) make obvious that it is not an illegal copy of the Harry Potter movie. Obvious to anyone who looks, anyway. But why should the record and movie companies bother to look? They're unlikely to suffer any damages if ISPs take down the wrong files, and the consumers involved are unlikely to sue them."
Oct 03, 2002
"A bill introduced Wednesday in the U.S. House of Representatives approaches digital rights management (DRM) from consumers' standpoint by ensuring that people who buy digital media can make backup copies and play them on whatever device they like without fear of breaking copyright law, according to the bill's sponsor."
Oct 03, 2002
"Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., has finally introduced a long-promised bill that would outline how consumers can use electronic media, books and software in the digital age without running afoul of ever-stricter copyright laws."
Oct 02, 2002
"But carrots alone won't lure pirates away from the sweet nectar of illegal P2P downloads. No matter what, copyright owners cannot compete with free downloads - especially when the quality, availability, and usability of the free stuff is always improving. That's why I have proposed the Peer to Peer Piracy Prevention Act."
Oct 02, 2002
Apple is "not -- at least so far -- moving toward an anti-customer embrace with Hollywood's movie studios and the other members of the powerful entertainment cartel."
Oct 02, 2002
"The House of Representatives canceled a vote on Tuesday that would have postponed royalty payments for Internet radio broadcasts, after industry players said they could settle the issue on their own."
Oct 02, 2002
"In a fight to win back fans from the 'gray zone' of online song-swapping services, the music industry is borrowing a trick from its nemeses: free music downloads."
Oct 02, 2002
Record company executives and artists testify about the fairness of contracts. "[T]he wife of Lester Chambers, of The Chambers Brothers, claimed to have never received a royalty check, nor an advance, in upwards of 30 years. Ms. Chambers claimed that Columbia told her there were no overseas sales to report because The Chambers Brothers records were never licensed to an overseas distributor. She believed them until she started seeing her product on E-Bay and found 22 different foreign pressings of Chambers Brothers recordings [...]."
Oct 02, 2002
"The battle being waged in Washington over copyright in the digital age ratchets up a notch this week as new legislation is introduced aimed at clarifying consumer rights."
Oct 02, 2002
Great satire. "According to Rosen, the radio stations acquire copies of RIAA artists' CDs and then broadcast them using a special transmitter, making it possible for anyone with a compatible radio-wave receiver to listen to the songs."
Oct 01, 2002
DataPlay makes a DRM-friendly data format, but they're struggling to find funds. "Employees were told Wednesday they would be on mandatory leave, using up vacation and sick days if they have them, and going unpaid if they don't."
Oct 01, 2002
"MediaForce, a company that tries to stop file sharing on behalf of movie companies, has been patrolling the Internet and flooding some colleges and universities with cease-and-desist requests -- some of them apparently justified."
Oct 01, 2002
"Microsoft said it is to pay $7m for Liquid Audio Inc's US and international patents, believed to be around 20 or over in number. Liquid, which is currently being acquired by Alliance Entertainment, will get a royalty-free license to continue to use the patents."
Oct 01, 2002
"Hollywood may be the entertainment capital of the world, but the real song and dance is being played out in Washington. That's the real seat of power for the entertainment industry, which constantly tries to convince the nation's representatives to push through a continuing array of draconian, anti-consumer proposals, seemingly aimed at turning supposedly valued customers into content-absorbing zombies under their media masters' total control."
Oct 01, 2002
"Music lovers who have complained that compact discs are too costly were officially vindicated yesterday, as five big music labels and three national retailers settled a lawsuit charging them with price fixing."
Oct 01, 2002
"Sadly, the growing epidemic of illegal downloading and CD burning may make it a lot harder for a dream like mine to come true for other songwriters."

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