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Feb 28, 2003
"Sony Music, co-owner of the Pressplay online music service, has provided funding to rival service MusicNet, sources close to the companies said, the second such financial deal linking digital music competitors to emerge in recent days."
Feb 28, 2003
"Microsoft’s move last week to help users secure corporate documents with digital rights management will bring needed awareness to the technology but will hardly signal wide-spread adoption, according to observers."
Feb 28, 2003
"Recording and movie publishers cannot defeat Internet intellectual property theft by peer-to-peer networks such as KaZaA and other Napster successors. But they can beat them at their own game, say business students from around the globe who took part in a contest examining the entertainment industry's piracy crisis."
Feb 28, 2003
"A Norwegian teenager cleared of cyber piracy charges in a landmark ruling is to be tried again in an appeals court, his lawyer said on Friday."
Feb 28, 2003
"321 Studios is asking a judge to block Hollywood's attempts to stop it from shipping its DVD-copying products, claiming its software is protected free speech."
Feb 28, 2003
"Apparently our system detects the OpenOffice files as MS Office programs and alarms me, which in turn sends the notices. I failed my part by not reassuring clearly enough which property was infringed and now that I am aware of that fact we will try and fix the search terms of our system and of course be more aware of the possible mistake."
Feb 28, 2003
"[T]he list of titles provided to us by yourselves is unfortunately somewhat vague, and we believe there may in fact be 'false positives', with titles in our archive of old software originally made during a period between 1982 to 1992 matching currently available software."
Feb 28, 2003
"The site did not contain illegal copies of video games, software and movies, but instead featured message boards where people could share tips about pirated material. But the site was also used to market modification, or mod, chips. These have been a headache for game hardware makers for years."
Feb 28, 2003
"Says Jack Valenti, head of the Motion Picture Association of America: 'What does breaking the code have to do with research? Research for what? Are you researching cloning, or the laws of physics? We’re not dealing with Boyle’s Law here . . . we’re dealing with trying to protect a piece of property, a feature film, from being illegally stolen.'"
Feb 28, 2003
"But this case appears to have been the first such prosecution in the United States under the DMCA, a 1998 copyright law that generally restricts anyone from circumventing copy protection technologies or distributing software or hardware designed for circumvention purposes."
Feb 28, 2003
"The ease of getting patents makes it economically attractive to abuse the system in a number of unpleasant ways. People obtain patents and then ask businesses to pay licensing fees that are cheaper than the cost of mounting a legal defense."
Feb 28, 2003
"A dozen small newspapers scattered across the country have been sued in the U.S. District Court of Northern California for infringing patents that allegedly apply to technology used by their Web sites." The patents "concern the use of software to group multiple files into a system that allows computers to display abbreviated portions of the files on a single screen."
Feb 28, 2003
Pam Samuelson: "[O]ne of the things that I find disappointing is that when the DMCA legislation was in process, that there wasn’t an effort to have a calm conversation about that and see whether or not it could be tailored in a way that would limit, or allow the anti-circumvention rules the do the things that the anti-circumvention rules legitimately should be able to do and leave some room for fair use."
Feb 28, 2003
"Printer maker Lexmark International Group won a preliminary injunction Thursday in efforts to prevent a company from selling computer chips that allow toner cartridges to be recycled."
Feb 28, 2003
"The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), Hollywood's chief trade association, brought 12 cases against individuals who were allegedly auctioning pirated editions of popular films including 'Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets' and 'Die Another Day.'"
Feb 28, 2003
A list of comments submitted to the Copyright Office regarding exemptions to the DMCA.
Feb 27, 2003
"In its push to end online piracy, the entertainment industry should not forget that peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing promises to have valid educational uses as well, Penn State President Graham Spanier told a congressional panel in Washington, D.C., yesterday."
Feb 27, 2003
"[T]he message participants took away was that the time has come to spread the word to consumers and other industry players that the DMCA has gone too far and needs to be reined in. At some point when there's enough support, Congress will be forced to act."
Feb 27, 2003
"Key politicians chided universities on Wednesday for not doing enough to limit peer-to-peer piracy, calling unauthorized copying a federal crime that should be punished appropriately."
Feb 26, 2003
"Music and film execs obsess about our evil file-sharing ways, but demonizing the public they so desperately need won’t stop the free fall in the value of content. [...] It’s not so much the consumer who is on the wrong side of the law, but the entertainment industry that’s on the wrong side of economic laws."
Feb 26, 2003
"Kevin Conroy, the AOL senior vice president for entertainment, said its version of MusicNet would be far more popular because it would be integrated into the AOL service. Users will simply add the MusicNet fee to their existing AOL account and credit card numbers."
Feb 26, 2003
"America Online Inc. is launching a music service today that will enable its subscribers to listen to newly released music and copy, or "burn," it onto CDs for a fixed monthly fee. [...] The "MusicNet on AOL" service will have about 250,000 songs, including half of the most popular offerings on Billboard's Top 200 list."
Feb 26, 2003
"Legal online music services began their biggest test Wednesday, as America Online launched a long-awaited paid-subscription music plan aimed at competing with free services such as Kazaa."
Feb 26, 2003
"Singapore police netted their biggest-ever haul of pirated software and music CDs in an island-wide raid, arresting 17 people and seizing S$1.7 million ($973,600)worth of goods, authorities said Wednesday."
Feb 25, 2003
"Like the phoenix from the ashes, the once-wildly popular Napster song-swapping service is slated to be relaunched before the end of the year, its new corporate parent Roxio Inc. said."
Feb 25, 2003
"Napster, the pioneering online music service, is getting another lease on life with the launch by year's end of a legal, subscription-based music business, its new owners said Monday."
Feb 25, 2003
"Roxio Inc. of San Jose said Monday that it has hired Napster creator Shawn Fanning as a consultant to help revive the defunct file-swapping program as a legal, fee-based service by the end of the year."
Feb 24, 2003
"Still, there's no disputing the potential of TiVo, which has made great strides in a market projected to reach 23 million U.S. households by 2007, according to technology research firm IDC of Framingham, Mass."
Feb 24, 2003
"Trying to plug another potential hole in the anti-piracy dike, Hollywood studios have started a new round of private meetings with high-tech companies and consumer-electronics manufacturers to explore ways to stop unauthorized recordings. This time, the issue is how to preserve anti-copying signals on a digital television show, online video or DVD when converted from digital to analog."
Feb 24, 2003
"Jack Valenti, the president of the Motion Picture Association of America, has decided to take the battle against Internet piracy to a higher moral ground."
Feb 24, 2003
"Don't look now, but a team of lobbyists and politicians is gearing up to enact new digital copyright laws that will cost you more money and result in more government regulations."
Feb 24, 2003
"If copyright pirates are starting to feel a little paranoid, it's because tech companies and the entertainment industry are working hard to catch them."
Feb 24, 2003
"If the DMCA isn't modified, intellectual property experts warn, companies could claim violations when competitors made compatible products that linked up with their own. The result, they say, would encourage monopolies and severely curtail consumer choice."
Feb 23, 2003
"A look at a mythical rock band's earnings, with actual figures compiled from industry sources: [...] split four ways, [it comes to] $40,477.25 each, about the same as a city sanitation worker with two years' experience, without health benefits, vacation and retirement fund."
Feb 23, 2003
"Compact disc sales have slipped for several reasons, not all of them related to piracy or online music swapping. Critics complain that there is a dearth of blockbuster acts these days and that those with hits, like Britney Spears, often have short-lived careers. And with the average price of a compact disc at $14.21, they contend that music is simply too expensive for frequent purchases."
Feb 23, 2003
In a new paper, two economists argue that "copyrights, patents, and similar government-granted rights serve only to reinforce monopoly control, with its attendant damages of inefficiently high prices, low quantities, and stifled future innovation."
Feb 23, 2003
"If the Canadian Copyright Board anti-piracy plan goes through, the price of iPods would increase by 33 percent, according to a BusinessWeek Online article. The board is considering a plan to raise the levy on every CD-R sold from 21 cents to 59 cents, as well place a levy on the hard drives found in MP3 players."
Feb 22, 2003
"Microsoft Corp. and leading academic security and privacy research scientists from around the world today gathered for the first meeting of the company's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board."
Feb 21, 2003
"Piracy — which accounts for 95 percent of music sales in China, according to Berman’s organization — has forced multinational record companies serving the world’s most populous country to abandon classic-style album contracts, drop development of formal distribution channels and eliminate any possibility of a top-40 list based on sales."
Feb 21, 2003
"The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) says it helped 245 consumers submit comments to the Librarian of Congress and the U.S. Copyright Office requesting protection for certain ordinary uses of CDs and DVDs."
Feb 21, 2003
Fascinating article: "On a technical level, privacy and copyright are isomorphic problems. Information is to be shared with certain people and not with others."
Feb 21, 2003
"Canadian consumers, already paying a hidden private copying levy on certain computer and electronic products, may be required to pay dramatic price increases if a collective of recording companies, performers and publishers gets its way. This warning was issued by a new coalition of many of Canada’s largest electronics retailers and computer hardware and software manufacturers."
Feb 21, 2003
"Microsoft on Friday announced a new security technology that would allow businesses more control over who accesses documents and information stored on their computers."
Feb 21, 2003
"A Dutch company calling itself an "honest thief" has become the latest threat to an entertainment and recording industry beset by swelling numbers of file-swapping services. Operating in the Netherlands, Internet services company PGR--doing business as The Honest Thief--plans in the spring to license its software and provide legal advice to others who hope to set up the newest incarnation of peer-to-peer services."
Feb 21, 2003
"A group of music publishers filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against Bertelsmann for at least $17 billion, alleging that the German media company's investment in Napster led to massive abuse of their copyrighted works."
Feb 21, 2003
"What role should government play? Force Hollywood to charge for content but to deliver it the way consumers want it. It's exactly what Congress did in forcing the broadcasters to sell their content to cable TV operators."
Feb 21, 2003
"Yet now the Patent Office is singing a different tune. As its new head, former Republican Congressman James E. Rogan, said in an interview with the L.A. Times on February 7, 2003: 'This is an agency in crisis and it's going to get worse. It doesn't do me any good to pretend there's not a problem when there is.'"
Feb 21, 2003
"Kansas State U's Josh Ballard, a computer science senior, is a happy guy. When students went back to this fall, they discovered they could no longer use their p2p apps. And that's because a kill-em app created by Ballard now blocks exchanges."
Feb 21, 2003
"Rep. Howard L. Berman said he may abandon his controversial proposal to help Hollywood battle Internet piracy, in part because of complaints from an unexpected source: Hollywood."
Feb 21, 2003
"Frankly, those fewer hits and concentrated spotlighting of talents might also suggest lower consumer interest in music - sparked by less than compelling creativity and a belief that discs no longer represent such a great value among today's myriad of competing distractions."
Feb 21, 2003
"Microsoft Corp. today announced plans for Windows® Rights Management Services (RMS), a new technology for Windows Server 2003 that will give organizations advanced ways to help secure sensitive internal business information including financial reports and confidential planning documents."
Feb 20, 2003
"For months, the digital equivalent of a postal censor has been sorting through virtually all file-swapping traffic on the University of Wyoming's network, quietly noting every trade of an Eminem song or "Friends" episode."
Feb 20, 2003
"There is a danger, however, that all sorts of companies facing competition in parts and supplies businesses could add technological protections, then use DMCA as a weapon against third-party suppliers. One example: The auto industry, which long has wanted to shut down the independent crash-parts business, could put chips in fenders."
Feb 20, 2003
"As it turns out, so-called peer-to-peer networks are very good at distributing digital material, but very bad at hiding the sender or the receiver. Taking advantage of this transparency, record companies, Hollywood studios and other copyright holders are tracing users of peer-to-peer networks back to their Internet addresses and cataloging not only the items they've downloaded but also the goods they're storing for others to duplicate."
Feb 20, 2003
"Hollywood is seeking informers to combat tech-smart and often heavily armed Asian pirate gangs, which are flooding the world with cheap DVDs and robbing the American film business of $646 million a year, an industry official said on Wednesday."
Feb 20, 2003
"The online piracy of songs and films can be stopped but just shutting down illegal file-sharing services is not enough, says Rob Glaser, boss of Real Networks. [...] He points to the example of DVDs, which are copy-protected yet at the same time easy to use."
Feb 20, 2003
"Why are Democrats helping the entertainment industry stamp out new technologies that fuel economic growth?"
Feb 20, 2003
"Two world-renowned songwriters and two independent music publishers sued Bertelsmann for $17 billion Wednesday, accusing the German media conglomerate of deliberately helping users of the wildly popular Napster song-swapping service violate millions of copyrights."
Feb 20, 2003
Australia: "Recording companies have asked the Federal Court to allow their computer experts to scan all computers at the University of Melbourne for sound files and email accounts, so they can gather evidence of claimed widespread breaches of copyright."
Feb 20, 2003
"Lawsuits and proposed laws designed to curb online piracy of music and movies threaten to derail profit and innovation in the Silicon Valley, local technology executives were warned Wednesday."
Feb 20, 2003
"The lessons of Napster still reverberate within Silicon Valley's venture capital community, causing firms to withhold funding for promising new technologies that risk attracting entertainment industry lawsuits."
Feb 20, 2003
"The Digital Millennium Copyright Act is threatening innovation in Silicon Valley, and it's time for businesses and consumers to mobilize to change the law."
Feb 20, 2003
"Repressive copyright laws and costly lawsuits from Hollywood could strike a lethal blow to the U.S. technology industry or even "break the Internet," according to entrepreneurs and academics who dominated a heated digital rights conference."
Feb 20, 2003
"I cannot conceive of a way to ship the entire HDTV captured MPEG-2 recording between any two residential broadband customers in the existing Internet infrastructure; no matter how "fat" the upstream or downstream pipe is in a current apartment or house, transferring the sheer number of bits that comprise a single television show that was broadcast over the air encoded in ATSC is just not feasible."
Feb 20, 2003
"But, like all avenues previously explored, [the label's plans] failed, as people simply fed their stereo outputs through their sound cards and recorded live streams of the songs straight to MP3s. Within days, the complete album was already widely circulating."
Feb 19, 2003
"Opponents of Hollywood's drive to strengthen copyright law are mounting a new strategy: Require anything that has antipiracy technology built in to be clearly labeled and let consumers decide at the cash register."
Feb 18, 2003
"It is hard for some to ignore the irony that as Smithsonian Folkways uses CD-R's to further its business, much of the industry hopes to limit the technology's use."
Feb 18, 2003
"As political support grows, legislative proposals that place a heavier emphasis on the public domain might surface. Indeed, this type of proposal already appeared in Congress."
Feb 18, 2003
"The nation's colleges have quietly succumbed to pressure from the entertainment industry to crack down on student use of file-sharing networks to trade music and movies."
Feb 18, 2003
"Threedegrees is also a fascinating experiment in how music can be legally shared over the Internet. After much negotiation, the labels OK’d musicmix, once Microsoft agreed to somewhat hobble its features."
Feb 18, 2003
"In the Federal Court in Sydney today, record companies will try to seize evidence of song swapping by students using the computer networks of the universities of Sydney, Melbourne and Tasmania."
Feb 17, 2003
"But not everyone is pleased with the growing popularity of multi-region DVD machines. While it is not illegal to sell such machines in North America, the major studios are not happy about the potential lost revenue. To try and dampen their growing popularity, the studios have been coming up with several ways to make watching movies on these players much more difficult."
Feb 17, 2003
"Still, it seems irresponsible for music-industry officials to present these sales statistics as proof that piracy is overwhelmingly responsible for the industry's woes while conveniently ignoring the economic and technological context that puts those numbers in perspective. [...] No one is arguing that piracy should be allowed. But it's reasonable to expect that laws and rules designed to curb the practice be based on credible and truthful representations of the impact file-sharing is having on the music industry."
Feb 17, 2003
"In fact, if Palladium were to become a widely accepted way of protecting copyrighted material, Mr. Moglen says, it would create 'a closed system, in which each piece of knowledge in the world is identified with a particular owner, and that owner has a right to resist its copying, modification, and redistribution.'"
Feb 17, 2003
The BSA "said the concern is that lawmakers are putting in too much effort altering the DMCA -- which the industry says is in pretty good shape -- rather than enforcing the existing rules."
Feb 16, 2003
"Still, the company clearly is considering what the proper balance of consumer satisfaction and proper copy protection should be in the next version of Media Center. This is evidenced by some pointed questions for people answering the beta test survey."
Feb 15, 2003
"[W]e take the same position on intellectual monopoly that economists take on trade restrictions: although some modest protection might be desirable in special cases, it is more practical to focus on no-trade restrictions as a general rule."
Feb 14, 2003
Recommendations from Business 2.0: reduce CD prices, abandon copy protection, and buy Kazaa.
Feb 14, 2003
"Listen.com says it will sell songs below cost: 49 cents per download. But it faces many hurdles, including free file-sharing services."
Feb 14, 2003
"The very philosophy of the Constitution is to expect, oppose, and correct the inevitable abuses of power. And over the years, the Copyright Clause has become a flashpoint for just such abuse. While it is corporate, not government, power that is being abused, it is an abuse of a power granted under the Constitution nonetheless."
Feb 14, 2003
"The U.S. economy lost $9.2 billion through copyright breaches in foreign countries in 2002, the industry body International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA) reported Thursday. "
Feb 14, 2003
"Sharman Networks released a new version of its Kazaa file-trading software Thursday, adding new features and advertising partners the company hopes will aid in its legal struggle for its life."
Feb 14, 2003
"U.S. District Judge John D. Bates heard arguments Thursday morning on Verizon's latest legal maneuver to avoid complying with a Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) subpoena requesting the name of a Verizon Internet subscriber who allegedly downloaded more than 600 copyrighted music files in a single day."
Feb 14, 2003
"Trade groups for the record and film industries are turning up the heat in their efforts to get corporations to crack down on music and video piracy conducted on workplace networks."
Feb 13, 2003
"The bands give permission for people to share these files, but only on a person-to-person basis. They can be placed on someone's own server and distributed via the file transfer protocol, or FTP."
Feb 13, 2003
"Hundreds of public libraries across the country provide online access to their patrons in an attempt to bridge the digital divide, covering all areas of information need. Yet often these public libraries are not allowed to offer access — free or fee — to legal subscription databases maintained by the two largest legal vendors in the U.S."
Feb 13, 2003
"The defendants were charged with crimes that included violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, manufacturing a device to steal satellite signals, and conspiracy, each of which carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison."
Feb 13, 2003
"Invoking the controversial Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a federal grand jury has indicted six people on charges of developing software and hardware designed to hack into paid TV satellite transmissions."
Feb 12, 2003
"Copyright chicken littles" exaggerate the importance of the DMCA: "Though the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Copyright Term Extension Act -- the two most recent important amendments to U.S. copyright law -- are understandably controversial, they have not turned this essential branch of intellectual property law into a dangerous sword to be wielded by corporate Goliaths."
Feb 12, 2003
"Net freedom fighter Lawrence Lessig has urged the UK Government to ensure that laws designed to prevent digital piracy do not trample over the right of fair use."
Feb 12, 2003
"Some legal pundits will question whether an idea that downplays the profit motive will ever be widely embraced. Creative Commons, however, could help ensure that the Internet remains more than a shopping mall."
Feb 12, 2003
321 Studios "announced a $10,000 reward Tuesday for tips leading to the conviction of anyone using its DVD-copying software for piracy." The MPAA responded by saying that "Any use of 321's products on a copy-protected DVD is illegal."
Feb 12, 2003
"So if TV studios can learn anything from the experience of their colleagues in the music business, it's that consumers will respond favorably, and with open wallets, to programming they can record for their own use or to share with friends, without being treated like criminals."
Feb 12, 2003
"Fast net providers find themselves with a tricky dilemma as file-swapping becomes one of the most popular broadband activities."
Feb 12, 2003
"A new system designed to track the distribution of music downloads is being described by analysts and industry representatives as a positive step for sites that sell digital music on the Internet, but how these electronic tags will affect file-trading on peer-to-peer networks remains uncertain."
Feb 11, 2003
"Two recent court battles, as well as concerns raised by members, have prompted IEEE-USA’s Intellectual Property Committee to re-examine its position on the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and, in a pair of position statements, to urge the U.S. Congress to clarify some of the law’s provisions."
Feb 11, 2003
"Online music service pressplay announced Monday it had reached deals to distribute music from several leading independent record labels, including Sub Pop and DreamWorks."
Feb 11, 2003
The former Director of Legal Affairs for New Media at ASCAP proposes a statutory license for online transmissions.
Feb 11, 2003
Public domain books are big business: "Forget about agents and auctions and multimillion-dollar contracts. The stiffest competition in the book business may be among the many publishers staking claim to Dickens, Austen, Herodotus and Plato."
Feb 11, 2003
"Juries appeared to have grown less tolerant of intellectual property crimes last year, and they voted more than $641 million to prove it. That's how much juries awarded in patent, copyright and trade secret cases on The National Law Journal's Top 100 verdicts list, more than double the comparable amount last year."
Feb 10, 2003
"But Saunders of KMJM says it's not fair to place the blame on the consumer, not when record companies rip off artists with faulty contracts."
Feb 10, 2003
"For all the hand-wringing over music's migration into digital space, and the supposed folly of people swapping digitized tracks, there may be no better measure of a song's true worth than what happens to it once it gets online."
Feb 10, 2003
"The world's biggest Internet provider is also the world's biggest media company. As the entertainment industry prosecutes users who share music, will AOL take a stand?"
Feb 10, 2003
"A judge is expected to rule by the end of the month whether to grant a preliminary injunction that would stop a North Carolina company from making or selling computer chips that match remanufactured toner cartridges to Lexmark printers."
Feb 10, 2003
"The recording industry on Friday fought to preserve a preliminary courtroom victory, arguing that Verizon Communications has no choice but to hand over the identity of an alleged Kazaa music pirate."
Feb 10, 2003
"The multi-year legal struggle between upstart Internet radio operators and record companies over music royalties kicked off anew Thursday, when the U.S. Copyright Office issued an order that could send the combatants back before an arbitration panel."
Feb 10, 2003
On the Verizon case: "Bates's ruling would allow copyright holders using IP numbers to demand the identities of millions of people who have shared music files. This would be a major violation of personal privacy, and Bates ought to stay his decision until an appeals court can rule on the Verizon appeal."
Feb 10, 2003
The article "contends that not only may copyright law’s prohibition against unauthorized copying (17 U.S.C. §106) not be necessary to stimulate an optimal level of new creations, but that §106 appears to have a net negative effect on such output!"
Feb 10, 2003
"While other bands have toyed with everything from watermarked CDs to hermetically sealed CD players to keep their music from leaking to the Internet, the White Stripes took a decidedly more retro approach when sending out advance albums to critics, the logic being that any music journalist worth their weight in free CDs owns a record player."
Feb 10, 2003
Video-on-demand: "[M]any content producers are hesitant to make their products available on-demand for fear it will cut into their profits. Those that have are often owned by conglomerates that also own cable systems."
Feb 10, 2003
"Sarnoff Corporation today announced a breakthrough approach to digital cinema watermarking that will let a movie studio reliably trace a pirated copy of a film back to its source, even after the copy has been captured by a camcorder in a theater and then compressed at low bit-rates for illegal digital redistribution, such as over the Internet."
Feb 10, 2003
"A music industry trade body launched on Monday electronic identity tags to keep tabs on Internet music sales in a bid to compensate musicians and song writers as more of their works become available online." But the system "is not designed, nor is it intended for, keeping track of songs that wind up on online file-sharing networks, a major source of music piracy."
Feb 09, 2003
"But digital media analyst Phil Leigh at Raymond James & Associates sees an analogy with the end of prohibition, when drinkers returned to liquor stores and shunned bootleg booze."
Feb 07, 2003
"If Judge Bates's decision stands, anyone who claims copyright infringement can fill out a simple form, give it to a court clerk (not a judge), and bingo - they get information such as the name, home number, and address of any Internet user. [...] As long as copyright holders have nothing to lose in filing the requests, which can be done in large part by automated robots that scour the web for certain file names like "Harry Potter" or "George Harrison," thoughtless, privacy-infringing, and harassing requests will continue."
Feb 07, 2003
"What if Ford designed its cars so that all replacement parts and add-ons had to come from Ford? If a consumer installed spark plugs or a radio/DVD-player that were manufactured by a third party, the car wouldn't run. Plus, the consumer would be liable for copyright infringement."
Feb 07, 2003
"Intel and other computer-related companies will oppose a German official's proposal that personal-computer makers pay a fee to copyright holders for every PC sold, a spokesman from the chip maker said."
Feb 06, 2003
"These days, a killer program called DVD X Copy, from Chesterfield, Mo., startup 321 Studios, challenges my ethics."
Feb 06, 2003
The president of Universal Music says that "People are going to have to see the value of access to music rather than ownership of music."
Feb 06, 2003
"Leaders of major entertainment and technology trade groups, often at odds over piracy and copyright issues, have found something to agree on: Chances are slim that Congress will jump into their controversies with significant legislation this year."
Feb 06, 2003
"[Media] companies need to find new ways to add value, rather than demanding that legislators help them subtract it at the expense of technical progress and individual rights."
Feb 06, 2003
"A top Hewlett-Packard printer executive said that although intellectual property rights are vital in the printer industry, rival Lexmark is wrong to try to use a controversial copyright law to safeguard those rights."
Feb 06, 2003
"In a final round of skirmishing prior to a court hearing Friday, a North Carolina company argued that a controversial copyright law does not prevent it from selling computer chips that allow toner cartridges to be reused."
Feb 05, 2003
Quoting Fred Von Lohmann from the EFF: "All in all, I think Smith will be an improvement over Coble on copyright issues. However, it's much too soon to say how much of an improvement he may turn out to be."
Feb 05, 2003
"A group that calls itself 'Europe's creative sector' has slammed the EU's crackdown on piracy, calling the measures 'inadequate.'"
Feb 04, 2003
Interview with Valenti, lots of choice quotes: "What is fair use? Fair use is not a law. There's nothing in law. [...] In the digital world, we don't need back-ups, because a digital copy never wears out. It is timeless. [...] Today, it's illegal to copy a videocassette. No one has a fair use to copy a videocassette. If you lose it, you get another one, and there's nothing wrong with that."
Feb 04, 2003
"The studios are hissing away over digital copyright protection and are baring their fangs, even after they've extracted blood from technology companies in the form of myriad design compromises to stop copying. After every agreement that has been hailed as the solution, a new problem has cropped up: the 'analog hole' or something else."
Feb 04, 2003
"'This is a matter of economics and control. Who are they to dictate what my choices are?' said Bill Aho, chief executive of ClearPlay, a Utah company that provides software to mute and skip movies."
Feb 04, 2003
"The file-swapping networks plaguing movie and music moguls are starting to figure out how to make a legitimate buck."
Feb 04, 2003
Comic: "'It's important for the public to see that the dark scourge of piracy includes more than the jolly slashing of swords and sinking of ships," said a grim MPAA chief Jack Valenti."
Feb 04, 2003
"Kevin Bermeister, Altnet's chief executive, says he has tried to establish a working relationship with music companies — even after they sued. He says he has sometimes won the interest of executives, but never their lawyers."
Feb 04, 2003
Interview with John Perry Barlow. "Because economic success in an information economy depends not on scarcity, but on familiarity. You can be the greatest songwriter in the history of song and if 10 people are the only ones who ever heard your songs, it doesn't matter. [...] All of this stuff about 'piracy' is fomented entirely by the record and film industries to perpetuate business models that are completely disadvantageous to both the creator and the audience. They are the biggest pirates in the deal."
Feb 03, 2003
In the past five years alone, an emerging alternative to mainstream radio—Internet broadcasting—was nearly smothered by new rules imposed not by the FCC, but by the Copyright Office. Some last-minute legislation softened the injury, but still left many Netcasters with legitimate complaints."
Feb 03, 2003
CEO of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry: "Online music piracy is a major problem; there is no doubt of that. But it is a problem to which we are responding proactively - helping to develop the new business models, and defending the rights of record producers, artists and others in the creative chain."
Feb 03, 2003
"Broadcasters and their program suppliers have had almost total control over how we view their products since the dawn of TV. The real magic with TiVo and other PVRs isn't the ability to skip commercials, but rather the unprecedented opportunity to wrest nearly absolute control over the time and manner in which programs will be viewed. Skipping or deleting commercials is but a cherry on the sundae."
Feb 03, 2003
"Standard-setting to achieve interoperability of Internet networks, codecs, and media players (both hardware and software) certainly has its place as a potentially pro-competitive activity. Traditional antitrust analysis would tend to focus on whether standard-setting might tend to suppress competing standards, yet would allow for the pro-competitive objectives of achieving interoperability among diverse products and systems. What is passing 'under the radar' is the creation of standards to enable 'automated agreements in restraint of trade' along the lines of the examples above."
Feb 03, 2003
"This 'gratuitous transfer of wealth,' as Justice John Paul Stevens described it in his dissent, might have gone unchallenged had digital activists not already been confronting efforts by media companies to expand their control of valuable content--ostensibly in response to the threat of digital piracy."
Feb 03, 2003
"[B]y publicly stating his support for DVR show-swapping, Powell has damaged, if not destroyed, his credibility on digital copyright issues. I believe that he needs to recuse himself when the subject comes before the commission."
Feb 03, 2003
"[T]he filtering companies have a free-speech right to tell consumers at what point in a movie they will find offensive portions, and consumers have a right to heed them and press their remote controls. No law bars these software companies from taking the next step and creating tools to automate the process of avoiding offensive scenes."
Feb 03, 2003
"Can Microsoft be trusted? How music labels, Hollywood studios and consumers answer that question could determine whether the software giant dominates digital media the way it does Web browsers or desktop productivity applications, say analysts."
Feb 03, 2003
"Aside from offending basic human principles that art should know no borders, it seems hard to believe that the region scheme could even be legal in an era of supposed free trade and globalized culture."
Feb 03, 2003
"When the music industry focuses its energy upon putting out a quality product and adapts its marketing strategies to today’s times and technology, it might see a boost in sales."
Feb 02, 2003
Janis Ian: "After I first posted downloadable music, my merchandise sales went up 300%. They're still double what they were before the MP3s went online."
Feb 02, 2003
"The European Commission on Thursday presented a draft directive that punishes copyright infringement for commercial purposes, but leaves the home music downloader untouched, infuriating the entertainment industry."
Feb 01, 2003
"This stalemate is not only a threat to our rights, but also just as responsible as any other factor for the high-tech downturn. If the content industry had been more active, perhaps we'd already be enjoying movie delivery via broadband networks."
Feb 01, 2003
"A record executive and his son make a formal case for freely downloading music. The gist: 50 million Americans can't be wrong."
Feb 01, 2003
"If you think your prized collection of DVD movies will last a lifetime, think again - some are already starting to rot while others are falling apart." And backups are illegal.

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